Anniversary

This week we’ll hear scores of year-later stories about Haiti. The newspapers will remind us of the terror that struck our Caribbean neighbors and how many people died, how many bodies remain entombed in the rubble and how many people continue to live in tents.  We need to hear this.  We need to remember because we quickly move on when tragedy strikes. My friend pastoring in New Orleans and continuing the post-Katrina clean-up and rebuilding project knows well how people forget. It was the summer of 2005, and now these few years later, history and the nation has moved on. New Orleans remains distressed. Many thousands of homes remain to be rebuilt.  No doubt, Haiti is far worse. My latest visit less than two months ago was shocking. So little has been done to relieve the misery of our neighbors. I use the word ‘neighbor’ because Jesus often talked about our responsibility to extend our love beyond our own kith and kin.

Often people will ask, “What can I do?”  We hear of people in distress and we want to pitch in.  We want to come alongside them.  Herein lies the problem. Our Granada Serve the World leaders have discovered how difficult it is to assist the Haitian people. Government regulation, corruption, and the lack of infrastructure means that everything moves at a crawl in Haiti.  Immediately after the earthquake, Granada began gathering supplies and sent shipping containers of foodstuff to support our brothers and sisters there.  I had the privilege of visiting Haiti and working to provide support during those early days.  Right away, Granada’s leaders knew that the long-term issue would not be food but housing.  Men like Dave McCloud, Mario Trevilla, Daniel Nieda and Joe Muniz got into action drafting a housing plan for Haiti.  Architectural plans were created and the work of making the plans a reality began.  Today, we are poised to fulfill those plans.

We are not giving up.  The difficulty of getting projects completed in Haiti has caused us to scale back our plans, to begin smaller and see what doors God opens for our work to grow.  Originally we were looking to develop a large piece of property in the city of Mirebalais.  This project has been met with delay after delay.  Rather than sit on the sidelines while those obstacles are removed, we have directed our attention to assist brothers and sisters in Christ who have lost their homes close to the epicenter of the earthquake.  We selected prime building sites where church members’ homes were destroyed.  We are ready to return to build.

What can you you?  As always, pray for the people of Haiti.  They desperately need housing and clean water and jobs.  Much of the battle ahead is also spiritual.  They need hope. Second, you can give toward the work Granada in Haiti.  These funds are being used to support the building project in Haiti and will be used to construct homes for brothers and sisters.  I have been told that only 15% of monies pledged by supportive nations has actually been received for work in Haiti.  The church has the opportunity to show true generosity that flows from the gospel.  Jesus has given so much for us.  We should be the most generous people on earth.  Third, go. We will have a team going to Haiti to facilitate a home construction project in the next sixty days.  Contact the Serve the World office to indicate your interest in participating.  Finally, at the Serve the World Conference this year, we will have a pastor from Port-au-Prince with us to provide us an update on the work.  We will work alongside members of his church in Port-au-Prince.

One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Sandy on August 11, 2018 at 9:38 pm

    The picture alone is mindboggling. Thank you for not giving up.

    Reply

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